Pale Crescent Butterfly (Phyciodes pallidus)

Today I saw what I believe are two Pale Crescent Butterflies.

Phyciodes pallida

Phyciodes pallida

I haven’t seen Pale Crescents before, so I went online to submit the siting with Butterflies and Moths of North America.  At some point they will review the photograph and either reject its validity or register it as a valid siting.  Then they let me know their determination.

I have registered unusual plant sitings with the USDA also, when I have seen a native species that they did not have on record is existing in my county.

Pale Crescents fly in the dry mountainous areas of the western United States, and its host plants are thistles instead of Asters, like most Crescents.  It likes thistles (Cirsium spp), Milk Thistle (Silybum marianus), and European thistles (Carduus spp).

I am no expert on butterflies, although I generally recognize my little visitors.  Had to look these two little guys up.  I am glad this little Pale Crescent held still long enough for a photograph, I am not usually quick enough for butterflies.

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About rebeccatreeseed

I am a naturalist raised by naturalists. Treeseed is my earned name, while Rebecca is my birth name. I am of Northern European descent, with a quarter Irish.quarter thrown in. I suspect I was a product of northern invaders into Ireland into Ireland. but hard to say since DNA disproved the family story about Apache blood! I have found some odd ancestors to replace them. Last year I bought 5 acres of pinyon-juniper forest on the side of a mountain in Santa Fe County, New Mexico. I am fulfilling a lifetime dream of a cabin in the mountains and a food forest that will feed me and local wildlife. I want to share this new phase of my life with others that might be interested.
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