Siberian Elm Invasion

Last fall I saw a one inch tree seedling and dug it up. It is in a pot on my patio. I was dreaming of a nice native even though it looked like a Siberian Elm (Ulmus pumila).

Eradicate! Stay pure! Native only!

My empathy is with the Elm when I hear “eradicate,” Then again I can think Destroy the Invader Elm because he is the quintessential invader. Ambivalent.

Reasons I can think to keep this bittie bad boy are: edible leaves, inner bark, and berries. It is from Tibet, like the Dalai Llama. It is surviving on the Gobi Desert and some of our natives are dying from drought stress. Birds like it and are spreading them everywhere and we grew up eating whatever birds planted before us.

Reasons to eradicate same… well, they are not from around here.

Walked way up the hill this morning and there was another Siberian Elm on the hottest, steepest, driest part of the hill. I will plant the bittie boy out once the monsoons start. I’ll let you know if he turns out to be a native after all.

Twelve years into drought, I am lucky to have seedlings. I note that the slash where the developer tried to make a road for the uphill property behind my neighbor has small trees at about the same rate as my larger ones. I still have a lot of pinyon pines but also lost many to pine bark beetles.

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About rebeccatreeseed

I am a naturalist raised by naturalists. Treeseed is my earned name, while Rebecca is my birth name. I am of Northern European descent, with a quarter Irish.quarter thrown in. I suspect I was a product of northern invaders into Ireland into Ireland. but hard to say since DNA disproved the family story about Apache blood! I have found some odd ancestors to replace them. Last year I bought 5 acres of pinyon-juniper forest on the side of a mountain in Santa Fe County, New Mexico. I am fulfilling a lifetime dream of a cabin in the mountains and a food forest that will feed me and local wildlife. I want to share this new phase of my life with others that might be interested.
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