Band-tailed Pigeon

This morning I heard a distinctive oo oo ooooo call of the Band-tailed Pigeon (Columbia fasciata). I haven’t heard it before and am excited to have them. I believe it is the call of the male to entice the female to nest.

This particular pigeon feeds in trees and live in dense forests. They can be 12 ounces and 15″ long, an edible game bird. Trouble is, they were nearly hunted to extinction in the early 1900s and are just making a comeback. They usually have only one offspring each season (March to late Spring).

I planted a Western Sand Cherry (Prunus pumila besseyi) today that they should like. This year the juniper berries are coming along, as are the pinyon nuts. Flower seeds in abundance. I hope they stay.

Joyful sight this morning … the Asian Pear is in bloom.

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About rebeccatreeseed

I am a naturalist raised by naturalists. Treeseed is my earned name, while Rebecca is my birth name. I am of Northern European descent, with a quarter Irish.quarter thrown in. I suspect I was a product of northern invaders into Ireland into Ireland. but hard to say since DNA disproved the family story about Apache blood! I have found some odd ancestors to replace them. Last year I bought 5 acres of pinyon-juniper forest on the side of a mountain in Santa Fe County, New Mexico. I am fulfilling a lifetime dream of a cabin in the mountains and a food forest that will feed me and local wildlife. I want to share this new phase of my life with others that might be interested.
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